Experiences of Women Receiving Failed Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT) Results
ACOG ePoster. DeLoria M. 10/30/20; 288910; 13K
Madeline DeLoria
Madeline DeLoria
Abstract
Introduction: Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) usually returns a result; however, a small percentage of samples are reported as 'no results'. This study aimed to understand the experiences of women who received failed NIPT results and identify strategies to guide clinicians.

Methods: A retrospective questionnaire collected responses from 91 women who received a failed NIPT result in a current or recent pregnancy. Questions assessed the women's knowledge of NIPT, understanding of the failed result and increased risk of chromosomal anomaly, emotional impact, and follow-up testing decisions. Semi-structured telephone interviews expanded on initial questions and were completed by 47.3% (43) of respondents.

Results: Only 27.5% (25/91) of women knew that NIPT could show no result prior to testing and 78.0% (71) reported a moderate to high worry score of 6 or higher (10-point scale) upon receiving the failed result. 98% chose to repeat NIPT after the initial failed result. A post-test counseling time of less than 10 minutes was considered insufficient (p < 0.1). Participants suggested that clinicians should provide more pre-test information about possible failed results, communicate results by direct contact versus email, and convey more details when reporting failed results.

Conclusion/Implications: These results indicate how clinicians might better inform patients concerning failed NIPT results. Given the strong preference for more pre-test information and the intense emotional response of receiving a failed NIPT result, we recommend pretest counseling include discussion about a possible failed NIPT result and its consequences, and that sufficient time is allotted for post-test counseling when providing failed results.

Introduction: Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) usually returns a result; however, a small percentage of samples are reported as 'no results'. This study aimed to understand the experiences of women who received failed NIPT results and identify strategies to guide clinicians.

Methods: A retrospective questionnaire collected responses from 91 women who received a failed NIPT result in a current or recent pregnancy. Questions assessed the women's knowledge of NIPT, understanding of the failed result and increased risk of chromosomal anomaly, emotional impact, and follow-up testing decisions. Semi-structured telephone interviews expanded on initial questions and were completed by 47.3% (43) of respondents.

Results: Only 27.5% (25/91) of women knew that NIPT could show no result prior to testing and 78.0% (71) reported a moderate to high worry score of 6 or higher (10-point scale) upon receiving the failed result. 98% chose to repeat NIPT after the initial failed result. A post-test counseling time of less than 10 minutes was considered insufficient (p < 0.1). Participants suggested that clinicians should provide more pre-test information about possible failed results, communicate results by direct contact versus email, and convey more details when reporting failed results.

Conclusion/Implications: These results indicate how clinicians might better inform patients concerning failed NIPT results. Given the strong preference for more pre-test information and the intense emotional response of receiving a failed NIPT result, we recommend pretest counseling include discussion about a possible failed NIPT result and its consequences, and that sufficient time is allotted for post-test counseling when providing failed results.

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