Accurate Assessment of Blood Loss During Cesarean Delivery Improves Estimate of Postoperative Hemoglobin
ACOG ePoster. Rubenstein A. 04/27/18; 211562; 17B
Andrew Rubenstein
Andrew Rubenstein
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)
Introduction: The need for red blood cell transfusion for patients having cesarean delivery is ideally based on an evaluation of both clinical indicators and laboratory studies. In practice, transfusions are often given to women based on estimated intraoperative blood loss (EBL) and/or the postoperative hemoglobin level. Since visual estimation is known to be inaccurate, we postulated that a more accurate determination using a novel colorimetric device would be better correlated with postoperative day one hemoglobin than visual estimation.

Methods: A formula incorporating both height and weight was used to estimate blood volume and, by including preoperative hemoglobin, red cell mass. Assuming a constant blood volume either the visual EBL (n=32) or EBL using a novel colorimetric device (Triton System™, Gauss Surgical) that incorporates a mobile application to photograph sponges and canisters and calculate their hemoglobin content (n=53) was used to predict the postoperative day one hemoglobin value in patients where either the visual estimate or colorimetric estimate was 1,000 ml (a common definition of hemorrhage).

Results: The predicted postoperative day one hemoglobin level using the device was better correlated with the actual value (R squared=0.319) than the predictions using visual EBL (R squared=0.035) (P=.027).

Conclusion/Implications: In mothers with high blood loss, EBL using the novel device was a more accurate predictor of the postoperative day one hemoglobin than visually estimated blood loss. Clinical use of this information has the potential to improve transfusion practice in cesarean delivery patients and positively impact maternal health.

Introduction: The need for red blood cell transfusion for patients having cesarean delivery is ideally based on an evaluation of both clinical indicators and laboratory studies. In practice, transfusions are often given to women based on estimated intraoperative blood loss (EBL) and/or the postoperative hemoglobin level. Since visual estimation is known to be inaccurate, we postulated that a more accurate determination using a novel colorimetric device would be better correlated with postoperative day one hemoglobin than visual estimation.

Methods: A formula incorporating both height and weight was used to estimate blood volume and, by including preoperative hemoglobin, red cell mass. Assuming a constant blood volume either the visual EBL (n=32) or EBL using a novel colorimetric device (Triton System™, Gauss Surgical) that incorporates a mobile application to photograph sponges and canisters and calculate their hemoglobin content (n=53) was used to predict the postoperative day one hemoglobin value in patients where either the visual estimate or colorimetric estimate was 1,000 ml (a common definition of hemorrhage).

Results: The predicted postoperative day one hemoglobin level using the device was better correlated with the actual value (R squared=0.319) than the predictions using visual EBL (R squared=0.035) (P=.027).

Conclusion/Implications: In mothers with high blood loss, EBL using the novel device was a more accurate predictor of the postoperative day one hemoglobin than visually estimated blood loss. Clinical use of this information has the potential to improve transfusion practice in cesarean delivery patients and positively impact maternal health.

Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies