National Trends for Reporting Opiate Use Disorder in Pregnancy and Available Treatment Resources
ACOG ePoster. Oben A. 04/27/18; 211556; 16E
Ayamo Oben
Ayamo Oben
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Abstract
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Introduction: Between 1999 and 2013, the prevalence of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in the United States increased almost 300%. Regional differences in the NAS prevalence highlight the need for comprehensive prevention strategies for opioid use disorder (OUD) in pregnancy. Our objective was to assess the presence of legislation requiring reporting of OUD in pregnancy, as well as available treatment resources.



Methods: We surveyed each state for existing laws or pending legislation requiring reporting of OUD in pregnancy by searching state government websites for keywords/phrases and contacted state officials directly to confirm the presence or absence of pertinent legislation. Information treatment resources offered and priority access to pregnant women was also collected.



Results: Fifteen states have active legislation for reporting OUD in pregnancy. Eighteen states treat OUD in pregnancy as child abuse. Twenty-five states provide priority access to pregnant women with OUD. The states not requiring reporting of OUD in pregnancy had a higher prevalence of NAS.

Conclusion/Implications: Less than half of states have active legislation requiring OUD in pregnancy reporting. The rising prevalence and healthcare costs associated with NAS continue to confirm the need for legislation and comprehensive guidelines for opioid prescribing in each state, as well as the establishment of treatment resources for our pregnant patient population.


Introduction: Between 1999 and 2013, the prevalence of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in the United States increased almost 300%. Regional differences in the NAS prevalence highlight the need for comprehensive prevention strategies for opioid use disorder (OUD) in pregnancy. Our objective was to assess the presence of legislation requiring reporting of OUD in pregnancy, as well as available treatment resources.



Methods: We surveyed each state for existing laws or pending legislation requiring reporting of OUD in pregnancy by searching state government websites for keywords/phrases and contacted state officials directly to confirm the presence or absence of pertinent legislation. Information treatment resources offered and priority access to pregnant women was also collected.



Results: Fifteen states have active legislation for reporting OUD in pregnancy. Eighteen states treat OUD in pregnancy as child abuse. Twenty-five states provide priority access to pregnant women with OUD. The states not requiring reporting of OUD in pregnancy had a higher prevalence of NAS.

Conclusion/Implications: Less than half of states have active legislation requiring OUD in pregnancy reporting. The rising prevalence and healthcare costs associated with NAS continue to confirm the need for legislation and comprehensive guidelines for opioid prescribing in each state, as well as the establishment of treatment resources for our pregnant patient population.


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